Perspective

I’ve had the beginnings of a few blog posts in my head, but they’re usually gone by the time I get home to my computer. Or they feel to self-absorbed, too naïve and far-reaching. Is there anything worse than a mommy blog preaching about how imperfectly beautiful life is?

#blessed

#authenticlife

#shutup

I hate those blogs. Where did they come from and why? I have a child, but that doesn’t mean I have the magic formula for potty training, air travel, or sleeping through the night, and I hope that when I write that we went here or did that, that you do not think I’m telling you what to do nor how to do it.

I’m an American expat/immigrant (I’ll use both until I have a chance to write about the difference between these politically charged words) mom living in Berlin. There are a lot of us and I can only share what I do and hope you come back to read more.

I’ve also been thinking of the refugees, and how shallow it feels to write about last weekend’s Verkauffsöffenesonntag. There are thousands of people fleeing to Berlin every day. If you’d like to help them, please click through the links below. All of them will lead you to local, grassroots-level groups committed to helping people build stable, safe lives.

Kreuzberg Hilft — We dropped off a donation here earlier this week. Website in German only.

Refugees Welcome/Flüchtlinge Willkommen — Has been described as the “Airbnb for refugees.” They help set up refugees with spare rooms in actual homes, not camps/shelters. Website in German and English.

Give Something Back to Berlin — A list of volunteer needs and offerings. I just signed up to mentor a refugee university student (via Skype). Website in English.

Finding Berlin has a great write-up with suggestions for further help. I’ve been referring back to it quite a lot the past few weeks.

I hope you take a moment to read and click through even if you are not in Berlin. There are so many ways to help.

PS: I’ve edited the post to include an image of the Französischer Dom. The church was built for the Huguenot refugees in the 18th century.

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