Reading “Dackel Franz sucht seinen Schwanz”

S has started protesting less when we speak German to her. Although, occasionally she does tell me to “stop talking that English,” “English” being her word for “language,” because she is an imperialist monster.

I’ve been slipping between translating her German books and simply reading the words on the page. Sometimes I get away with it, especially when I read Die kleine Raupe Nimmersatt (The Very Hungry Caterpillar) and Dackel Franz sucht seinen Schwanz (Franz the Dachshund Searches for his Tail).

I bought Dackel Franz when I was pregnant in München and worried that I would never go anywhere ever again. I stuffed every spare pocket in  our suitcase with books. Most of my choices were based on the lovely illustrations and I still have a few that are still a little too hard for S to understand (I’m especially looking forward to Johanna im Zug!) Franz, however, is a winner.

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The book, written by Eva Schatz and illustrated by Susanne Straßer, is about an adorable little Dachel (the diminutive of Dachshund more widely used in German. One thing you should know about German – they have many exceedingly long words for very specific things, but they also love their diminutives and abbreviations ) who wakes up one morning to find his tail is missing.

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He searches all over town asking at the Metzgerei and the Markthalle, among other places. Finally, he makes his way to the zoo where he makes an interesting discovery.  Along the way, the dog’s tail pops up in a few unexpected places and trying to figure out what its doing and why adds another layer of fun.

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2 thoughts on “Reading “Dackel Franz sucht seinen Schwanz”

  1. I wondered if I could get sing a long songs in German that would play on a UK DVD player, I thought it would help my language acquisition in a fun way. This piece has reminded me of this I must check.
    Best wishes
    Charlotte

    • I think Germany and the UK are part of the same DVD region, so you shouldn’t have a problem. I like to use Duolingo for daily practice now that I’m in the US.

      Thanks for reading!
      Aryn

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